How to diversify your online presence as a photographer

How to diversify your online presence as a photographer

Photo by Artiom Vallat

The Internet offers endless possibilities to showcase yourself as a photographer but make sure to not rely on just a single platform

The age is digital and keen amateur and experienced professional photographers alike have adapted to show their work online. With that in mind, you can soon fall into sticking with just one or two platforms because of their familiarity. But, if the constant ups and downs of Internet trends and their companies have shown us anything, it's that you can't rely on just one channel.

"Consider sharing your work on more than one platform to avoid losing a big chunk of your digital presence."

Some platforms change the way they work at a minute's notice, leaving their loyal users disgruntled, while others simply go out of business or stop operating. Consider sharing your work on more than one platform to avoid losing a big chunk of your digital presence.

It will help preserve your work online for longer. You may even come across different communities that give you something different – advice, support, inspiration, or even photo and print sale opportunities. You may also be interested in developing additional skills, like curating, sharing educational content, learning design, writing alongside your photography, and much more.

1 Use a website to manage your online persona 

If you're not a professional photographer, you may immediately dismiss the idea of building yourself a website. But, if there's one place where you can have complete control of what is on show, it's your website. You are in the driver's seat and have all the tools to present yourself and your work exactly how you want the public to see it.

"As you grow and your photography changes, so will your website. You can view it as a one-stop-shop for people to learn more about your work, regardless of which social media apps are trendy at the time."

Your website shows who you are as a creative artist, a skilled technical photographer, or someone in between. You can add numerous galleries of your work or only stick to showing featured ones. You can also add a blog to document your journey and give people a way to connect with you.

As you grow and your photography changes, so will your website. You can view it as a one-stop-shop for people to learn more about your work, regardless of which social media apps are trendy at the time. If you shoot travel, street, and landscape photography, you can share your website with those you meet along the way – particularly handy if you want to take portraits of strangers and show them your work first.

Many website builders also offer tools to sell physical and digital products. So, if you've ever thought about publishing your work – like a PDF about a recent project, photo adventure, or a guide on shooting tips – give it a go. If nothing else, you will learn more about how to design and publish your content online, which will come in handy for any future projects.

Consider setting up a newsletter if you're looking for ways to build up a following through your website. You can share your latest updates, photo trips, ideas, products, and much more.

Sky is the limit when it comes to your website! But, to give you a starting point, gain inspiration from templates and note down the most important aspects of your photography you want to showcase. Photo by Tom Eversley

2 Find image sharing platform that works for you

Are you getting frustrated with Instagram moving towards video content and business ads? There are plenty of other platforms where you can share your work!

First, ask yourself what aspects draw you to posting your photos online  – is it finding like-minded people, finding inspiration from others in different genres, or simply having a place to collect your photo memories?

For those leaving Instagram, some apps, like Pidgeon, available both on Android and iOS, have begun offering an alternative platform to share photos on the go. If mobile editing is your priority, look at VSCO, which also has a community aspect alongside editing tools.

If you want a more robust platform for your photography, give Adobe's Behance a go. You can engage with other people's work and share yours as individual photos or projects. Behance also lets you share video streams to show your creative process and has a mood board section where you can collect images that inspire you.

Editor's note:

With Picfair Stores you can easily link to the other platforms where you share your images and vice versalearn more about Picfair Stores and Picfair Plus here.

Finding the right photo sharing apps can make mobile photography engaging and fun, especially on days you forget to bring your camera. Photo by Jacopo

3 Build authority through curation and written content

Have you ever looked at other photographers' blogs and thought you have nothing to contribute because everything is out there already? That couldn't be further from the truth! Every day new people pick up their cameras for the first time and look online for inspiration and guidance from people like you.

"Have you ever looked at other photographers' blogs and thought you have nothing to contribute because everything is out there already? That couldn't be further from the truth!"

Your experiences as a photographer, be it amateur or professional, are unique. With a little bit of dedication and consistency, you can build up authority simply by using words online. Written content covering photography, art, and travel topics mixed with photos will always be in demand. You won't find a better moment to start than now because even the most established photographers have imposter syndrome at times.

Using a blog to write about your experiences, tips, or general musings can help you make sense of your own photography journey and give you purpose. You can also use a blog to share more of your work and behind-the-scenes photos or videos that may otherwise not make it on your portfolio page.

Your blog is not the only place you can work on your craft as a photographer with a voice – you can submit article ideas to photography magazines and websites. Your presence as a photographer can encompass taking beautiful photos and mentoring, writing, and interesting content curation on sites like Flipboard and much more.

It may seem daunting to put your thoughts and ideas for everyone to see but writing can be a great addition to your photography and creativity as a whole. Photo by Cottonbro

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4 Allow your audience to buy your prints

It's one thing to get positive comments about your work online, but the satisfaction and confidence you get from others buying your photo prints are something else! With that in mind, consider setting up an online store where people can browse your work.

"Whether you have a big following on social media or prefer to only share your website with friends and family, having an online store is a long-term investment"

Whether you have a big following on social media or prefer to only share your website with friends and family, having an online store is a long-term investment. The best part is that you don't even have to handle any printing and shipping if you sell your photos on a platform like Picfair. You can simply share a link to your online store with people you meet along the way or direct them from your website and social media accounts. You get paid when they buy your photo prints, while the store handles printing and shipping for you.

As you can see, each online channel has its own benefits that you can use for your photography needs. Whether you like to occasionally post an image online or engage with the photo community daily, there is something for everyone.

Even if one of your favorite platforms shuts down or no longer serves its purpose, having your work accessible elsewhere will ensure the audience can still find your work and digital presence. Which online platforms help you express yourself as a photographer?

For you to start selling photos online, start by looking through your current collections and catalogs and work your way through. Image by Anete Lusina - f/2.5 | 1/125 | ISO 320
Editor's note:

Learn more about Picfair's print service for photographers with Picfair Stores.