5 stunning examples of portrait-orientated landscape photography

5 stunning examples of portrait-orientated landscape photography

Photo by Ian Francis

When you're starting in landscape photography it's easy to concentrate on framing your compositions in the landscape format, but tilting your camera to a vertical view can yield some fantastic results

If you're just getting started in landscape photography, it feels right (and natural) to orientate most of your shots to the landscape format. After all, it's the same way our eyes see the world around us, and without a doubt, most of your best outdoor shots will likely be landscape-orientated.

However, from time to time, it's worth mixing things up with your camera and challenging yourself by finding new perspectives for your landscape work. An easy way to do this is to start taking landscape shots in the portrait orientation - it helps you see the scene in front of you in a completely different way and you can come out with some highly creative images. Give it a try the next time you're out, and you'll be surprised at the results.

Here are some beautiful examples for inspiration:

Located at wedge pond in kananaskis Alberta. The last summer light hitting the clouds and reflecting off the still water made for a serene photograph. Image by Collin Toews Photography - f/7.1 | 1/30s | ISO 200
Saw those beautiful puddles while hiking around lake o'Hara. Canadian autumn definitely surprises with the amount of saturated colours you can see. Photo by Deniss Streha - f/22 | 1/125s | ISO 500
These chalk rock formations have been eroded by wind and sandstorms over time, leaving an alien-like landscape in the White Desert of western Egypt. Photo by Jeni Stembridge - f/7.1 | 1/160s | ISO 200

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A misty Mount Bachelor stands tall tall during a colorful, snowy sunrise in Bend, Oregon. Photo by Richard Bacon - f/14 | 30s | ISO 100
Colorful autumn forest by the edge of Casoca waterfall. Photo by Tiberiu Sahlean - f/11 | 1.3s | ISO 50